Saturday, January 05, 2008

Whole Wheat Cinnamon Bread

The Altitude Adjustment Section
There is nothing like the smell of fresh, basic, home-baked bread. Add some cinnamon and some whole wheat flour for good health, and you have a great loaf of bread. Great for toasting!

2 1/8 teaspoon yeast
1/4 cup warm water
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 cup honey
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup water
1 tablespoon butter, melted
1 teaspoon salt plus a pinch
1 1/4 unbleached flour
1 1/4 cup whole wheat flour

In a cup, combine yeast, warm water, and sugar. Set aside and let rise for 4 minutes, or until mixture bubbles up. Meanwhile in a small saucepan, heat milk, water, butter, honey, and salt and cinnamon. Heat till just before boiling. Pour warm liquid into bowl and let cool till it gets to 110 degrees. Now stir in 1 1/4 cups of white flour and 3/4 cups whole wheat flour. Then stir in the yeast mixture. Beat hard in bowl of your electric mixer for several minutes. Gradually stir in the remaining whole-wheat flour. Add more whole-wheat flour till the dough becomes stretchy and smooth. To knead dough with mixer, switch to dough hook and mix on low speed mix for 5 minutes. Now dough is ready for first rise.

Place dough in a greased bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise till double, about 45 minutes. Then dump out of bowl and punch down and knead a few times. Then return dough to oiled bowl for second rise, which should take around 45 minutes as well. While dough is doing second rise, preheat oven to 425 degrees. Set a roasting pan of boiling water in the bottom of the oven. Now take dough and form into a loaf. Pat dough out into rectangle and roll up and place in oiled loaf pan, seam side down. Now let rise for the third time. If you want to top of the loaf to be shiny brush with egg wash. Let rise 20 minutes and then bake loaf, at 425 for 15 minutes then turn down oven to 375 and bake for 18-20 minutes more, or until internal temperature reaches 190 degrees. To see if it's done, tip loaf out of pan and tap bottom. It should sound hollow. Great with tons of butter and jam, but who isn’t?